click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
. i had the opportunity to work in jim's campaign and go to washington and jim let me come back here in 1976. gang to know people. it was 1977 i had not yet announced -- i was at the state fair. the country was consumed in a raging debate about the panama canal treaties. as we were walking down the fairway a very angry crowd encircled george demanding that he explain his position on those treaties and change it. and threatening that they would work hard to defeat him in the next reelection if he didn't. george stood there and listened quietly. when it was his turn to talk, in a most recent, calm persuasive articulate way he shared with that group why those treaties were not only good for panama but what they meant for us. the crowd dissipated. as we walked back to the democratic booth i remarked that george, i can't help but note the contrast between that angry crowd and what you just did. he said i have learned a long time ago, it is a whole lot better to tell people what you believe from here than to tell them what you think they want to hear. [applause] george
other people worry about their own country. we have not problems in this country. >> jim, did you have anything to say? >> yes, i do have one question i can ask, it was george w. bush who wanted to do the libyan intervention, would you have supported it then? >> yes. >> okay, let's do something related to military and foreign policy and that is the issue of military spending. many on the left criticize the right for wanting to spend on the military print mitt romney has proposed that we spend $2 trillion in additional spending. lots of things, wanting to balance a budget, the annual deficit runs between one and $1.5 billion annually. i will start with you, bill. even with obama and his foreign policy, spending keeps going up. >> some folks don't talk about this in a great way. it is the kind of thing where most people -- [inaudible] you don't want to approach it strictly from a numbers basis. by the same token, throwing money at national security and problems it's not necessarily something that's going to solve the problem. >> unless you're ben bernanke. [laughter] does because it come
counting system we have in america. we are back to jim crow. not jim crow, it stopped or james crow systems analyst. that is how it is working. that is the new gimmick we are trying, that is happening and that is where the monies being spent and that's what makes the data trust dangerous. if they want to use it to pick out people who bowl and say bowlers made paul ryan fine but what if you are doing is mailing letters to soldiers on active duty with the game of challenging them, that is a crime according to bobby kennedy. and i have to say, while al gore grabbed his ankles in 2000 after he read, personally read my story that was breaking in england. this was before the supreme court ruled that thousands of like people were banished from the voter rolls in florida and after john kerry med -- read my book armed madhouse, he said that is why they lost the election and one of the last bills he introduced to make the stuck illegal on its face. right now you have to prove that it's racially biased. they are going after old jewish ladies and going after native americans. one of their big targets i
with jim cooper and others on the democratic side of the island laid out a broad framework that would put revenues on the table and spending cuts. i don't want to say that we would say it's got to be this or that simply because we don't know what the proposals are going to be. what i do know is we face a fiscal cliff is right around the corner and the only way i think we are going to resolve these problems is by working together as i have done in the last 22 months. >> moderator: brad schneider how to chew come up with a 70/30 split? schneider: i don't think there's an absolute number but if you look at what we have had in past congress, congress has had a challenge and we have a ryan planned that not once but twice my opponent voted for that continues to give additional benefits and cuts to the most fortunate americans additional subsidies to large oil companies and companies shipping jobs overseas and to pay for that, it is asking seniors to take medicare and the medicare guarantee and turn it into a voucher which will cos
. moderating the debate is action news anchorman jim gardner. hello. this is the only broadcast debate in the 2012 pennsylvania senate race between candidates bob casey and tom smith. and here are the rules to which the candidates have agreed for today eat meeting. the -- today's meeting. the format will include questions to the candidates from me and our two panelists. a coin toss determined the candidates' podium positions and the order of questioning. each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. the candidates will also have 90 seconds for closing statements, and the candidates are here to speak about the issues that voters are caring about in this very important campaign. and, gentlemen, to prepare for this debate, i asked an acquaintance what he has gotten out of the campaign. after a moment or two of consideration, he said, well, there's this senator zero thing, and then there's this tea party tom thing going on. and i asked him what else have you gotten out of the campaign, and he stared at me, and he said i can't really say. so i would ask you two gentlemen
they think it all ties back to that. a next session, please come out jim doherty, a very good long-time friend of mine who is a fellow at the council on foreign relations is going to moderate. but organize this in conjunction with the council on foreign relations as about u.s. competitiveness. let's get it underway, the panel is fair. all right, jim, take it away. >> great to be here in detroit. first time in a while. i have to make it happen more often. so were going to have a nice conversation. we have to cover a lot of a lot of things in 40 minutes, so we're going to start right away. you can see the panelists, backgrounds, michael, paul and ted, great panel. i'm 40 minutes that we try to cover as looking at infrastructure, education and immigration, trying to look at it through the lens of technology and the role of urban centers and take a look at what the current state is in the united states in each of these things, what some of our best as competitors are doing and maybe a couple sections on tactical things the united states can you do have a job. we'll try to take the call
. dan came in here in 2006 after being gone for many, many years to challenge jim walsh. >> moderator: okay, do you want to come in now? >> what's the question? >> moderator: you have not been the subject of the attack ads, but you have a positive message you want out. you have a 60 seconds on an issue of your choosing. >> thank you. i'm a central new york stative born and raised in syracuse, my parents from poland in the 1980s, they came here basically believing that this is the kind of country where you work hard, you can create a good life for your family, and that's not the case anymore. the american dream is far out of reach of too many people so what i support is the green new deal, public investment to put people back to work meeting today's challenges. that means addressing unmet community needs whether it's updating our hundred-year-old sewers in syracuse, developing energy for real energy independence. it support these policies to put, you know, the communities and put money in working people's pockets. i think we need new leadership. i said it before. my opponents represent
jim crow system. now we are talking about people who get preferences now were born in 1994. doesn't seem like very long ago to somebody my age. 30 years after the civil-rights act. according to the latest census one in four americans describe themselves as being something other than white. african-americans are not largest minority group anymore. latinos are larger minority group that african-americans and neither one of them is the fastest growing racial minority groups. fastest-growing major -- racial minority group is asian-americans. african-americans are growing at 12.3%. white americans only 5.7% rate. and other rapidly growing group are people like the president's who could check more than one box in the race and ethnicity section of their questionnaire. seems to me in a country like that we cannot have a legal regime that supports people according to their skin color and what country their ancestors came from and treat some people better and other people worse based on which silly little box they check. frequently the people who are arguing in favor -- let me tell you two
, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew freeman project under it all veterans day 5-k run for peace. last night i dedicated a memorial in our town, the captain matthew freeman project proudly announced a new scholarship we will be starting for the siblings of the fall and in combat. these are the forgotten mourners to often sacrifice, on their education to comfort family or deal with their own grief. after 11 years of work, very few people know about the families. these are parents, siblings, thousands of children to survive the death of their loved ones. as
civil rights bill. we remember him today as one of the last of the jim crow demagogue. he was. he was that. he was one of the last. but when we forget about strofm he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservative. what do i mean by that? what is that? the sun belt it's one of the big stories that is the flow of jobs and resource and population from the states of the northeast and the midwest to the south and the southwest. in the older post world war ii people. they recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. receiving lots of fundings from the federal government to build military at the time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi but states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and arizona and north carolina are being transformed in the postworld war two period by the historic shift as the period of the sun belt dominance. if you think about every president elected from 1963 comes from state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas and richard nixon from california.
today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of the period of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. you think about every president e
to respond. mr. casey you go first. casey: jim, thanks. if the supreme court were to make that decision would be a radical departure from where we've been over the generation. it would be a step in the wrong direction. we still have a way to go to make sure that the kind of discrimination which was in place for many generations is rectified that in justice is dealt with completely. we can have a big debate over how to do that but i don't think that we should take a radical departure from where we've been. and i hope, i hope that our supreme court wouldn't make a decision that could be based upon the ideology rather than what is best for the country to make sure that we are right on going wrong. >> moderator: mr. smith? smith: jim, when you ask that question, why was thinking i even with the great doctor, martin luther king, said in that speech of his that we should be judged not by the color of our skin that the content of our character. and i believe that we should try to end discrimination and bigotry wherever we find that. if we overturn that i don't think the federal government should be
think jim was also talking about. we need to make sure for those minimal protections are in place to okay, so the goal is a stronger defense for critical infrastructure. what else should we be doing? >> i think getting the companies to have a common level of knowledge, a vulnerability and potential response. here is a simple question that people could ask themselves. am i running windows 98? windows 98 is totally unsecure. so that is a lot of good examples of no-brainer questions. also, do i have automatic updates turned on. yes or no. if you don't have it turned out, you're going to have a problem. are you doing patches? do you know how many wireless devices connect to your network? do have some way to control when you plug in a thumb drive or some other device? this is not, in some ways, but the basic level you could take that would reduce a lot of this. it is not rocket science. you need a password management program. do you accept collect calls from russia? [laughter] >> because that happens. this is a good example. this is like the classic cyberstory. springfield water supply
good that you're you have a good predecessor there. i had jim kelly who had done a lot of work to set things up. and to get through a very tough time, and the other thing is as in the state department, you're not working alone. you are working with the national security counsel staff. i have talented people, mike green here in the audience worked with him until he was replaced by dennis wild. i was i felt we were ease coned in a good team. as for the challenges, i worked in the job in the second bush administration, and basically the challenge i think is always the amount of bandwidth in washington. if you take issues for being important and being urgent, it seems that the u gent always beats out the important. so maybe dating back to a few years before when ambassador lord had the position, i think everyone understand east asia definitely important. but i was getting constantly trump bid the fact that, you know, we had a double header going in afghanistan and iraq, and quite understandably we had president who will be to be immersed in the issues. and often and one of the challenges
are pretty good that you got a pretty good predecessor there, and i have jim kelly who have done a lot of work to kind of set some things up. and to get to a very, very tough time. and the other thing is that, in the state department you're not working alone. you're working with the national security council staff. so i had very talented people. mike green here in the audience worked with him until he was replaced by dennis wilde. so i must say, i felt that we're really discussed in a very good team but as for the challenges, i worked in the job for the second bush administration. and basically the challenge i think his oath the amount of bandwidth in washington. and if you take issues for being important and being urgent, it seems to be urgent always beats out the important. so maybe dating back a few years before when ambassador lord had the position, i think everyone understood east asia, definitely important, but i was getting constantly trump by the fact that we had double-header going in afghanistan and in iraq, and quite understandably we have a president who had to be immersed
from discrimination and slavery, it would have been worse in the jim crow era and worse in slavery. there are complicated social causes for this. i think that, you know, the great society, i think that the way that the welfare system worked for years, it's cultural, and i think it's also, you know, fundamentally, you know, has a lot to do with morality and religion and the fact that the -- the forces -- it's become more and more acceptable in our society to have children out of wedlock, and in particular, in the african-american community, and it's too bad. >> and the -- if social science does show anything, it is the correlation between two-parent families and achievement. >> absolutely, and, you know, that was also politically incorrect to say for a long time. i mean, that's the reason, you know, when daniel patrick pointed this out in the 1960s, he got such a fire storm of criticism, he stopped. brave a man as he was, he had nothing to do with this issue the rest of his career, but now it's becoming increasingly recognized on both sides of the aisle as roger says, you name a soc
. >> jim shannon. >> i think the prime minister -- corporal channing day always wanted to join the army and for eight years served as a medic. our job is to save lives -- [inaudible] to see someone willing to hell when all -- help when all hell is bursting down them. he will soon return to a mother, father, fors, brothers who loved her dearly. to the the community who are proud of the contribution she's made. [inaudible] her courage, her bravery and also her heroism. prime minister, would you agree with me that army medics are often the unsung heros of conflict, and would he degree to meet with me to discuss the implementation of -- [inaudible] >> well, first of all, i'd be very happy to meet him and his colleagues. it's something i have spoken to the deputy, the first minister and the deputy first minister in northern ireland. it hope it can be done, and i'd be happy to have that meeting. i think he's absolutely right that hose in the medical regiment do a fantastic job. it's been a huge honor and a privilege for me to meet some of them including in afghanistan, and when you see the se
in the state of ohio. so tune in to seize and then at 5:40 eastern time. we will go to jim next republican collar. go ahead, jim. >> caller: i highly disagree with reid on his that the benghazi affair is not the october surprise. i really believe if the debate could they knew all the facts of what happened there how could the president and secretary of state and secretary of defense said and watch what happened in real time if everybody understood that's what happened to me the story was a plan attached by al qaeda. >> guest: they were not watching in real time to realize i don't want to get into the specifics of the actual benghazi attack or anything around it. however there is reporting to be done. the full story as it were will be reported in the investigations both by the house of representatives and by the state department. so the republican controlled house of representatives by the way. so we look forward to those things coming out. whether or not it is the october surprise, i'm pretty sure it is not. i'm sure most voters are not paying attention to it. so we will see how this all p
to egypt with carter and sadat. i used to work for "the new york times." jim and i met in 1975, also, covering the bicentennial, election conquered. and we've been friends ever since throughout all the came pains, and i've seen sam over the campaigns. and jeanne livingston has been an associate for many years. >> what's this photograph? >> yes. that's the photograph that sort of symbolizes campaigning today and what the press has to go through. what we're seeing here is a rope line where the advance people for a certain candidate, in this case the dukakis people, try and control the press. that is, their movements, their acksess, where they're to go and not to go. and what had been happening in the dukakis campaign is we would land in an airport. there would be two advance people and there would be a clothe line, and they had like a mobile pin, instead of just a closed off pin, where the press would be able to go to. they got this wonderful idea of having a mobile pen. so you had two people, one with rope in each hand, running around making makeshift pens where the press could go. we
than 2 million jobs. we've created over 5 million jobs. and, you know, karl rove is smarter than jim messina i guess. [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> look, i would be spending 10% of gdp on education. in my view, history tells us that that is the level, which the best performing economies in the world typically -- were now at about eight. used to be at 10 and we are now at about eight. korea, the single most successful economy of the last years is at times and has been at 10 since it was an incredibly poor country. and so to me that's what i would do. so all i'm saying is i would start with the public system. i think that's what government should do. but in my view, it would also provide assistance to vary income depended assistance to private institutions as well. [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, look, it's a market that produced that growing inequality. these are inequalities of pretax income. the post-tax income is a little less unequal, but the truth is, you know, we provide lots of tax benefits for people at the top, too as well. so we are certainly not doing
, a really smart guy named jim milstein who is at the treasury department, the guy was possible for the restructuring of aig is the voyeur in investment in keene restructuring kind of person and he put out a proposal, which has many common ingredients that we saw from the mortgage bankers association. here, the emphasis is on a government agency. the federal mortgage insurance association, which authorizes management regulate a series of securitate there's the issue mortgage-backed securities and again, the company are not guaranteed, just security czar. the beauty of both of these proposals is that the technology in the infrastructure and system in the human capital of the gses would not be reset, that could form the basis of one of these securitize theirs to compete in the private capital market going forward. so i believe that there has been some consensus around a proposal that is feasible would work. one was issued by somebody who had an ax to. that is the mortgage association, but milstein coming from the treasury department come up or simply his view is what is best for t
from riyadh, ambassador jim smith followed by the air lab/u.s -- arab/u.s. relations, a view from the league of arab states which has a brand new ambassador here in washington. and then, of course, the palestinian future focusing on that as well as the gcc countries and yemen and what's been done in terms of the department of state and others trying to double u.s. exports internationally and globally but with special reference to the arab world. on top of business finance, human resource development and iran features here in the afternoon as well as does the views of the u.s./arab relationship from the arab media. thank all of you for being here today. see you this evening and tomorrow. >> thank you. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> the federal and state response to hurricane sandy continues. join us in just under an hour for today's fema briefing. the conference call will include fema chief craig fugate among others, you'll be able to listen to that live at 11:30 eastern on our companion network, c-span. and, of course, the road to the white house continues. now less than
some tweaks. this is jim. because the probability of loss is so high, private insurers won't underwrite. larry says it is silly to say the private insurance companies aren't capable of offering flood insurance. you can ensure anything for a price. eric says government insurance is in direct competition with u.s. businesses. government has no business being in the spirit >> host: the tweet is that the private insurance market can ensure anything given the right price, i think that's accurate. the private market can certainly insure something. it just depends upon the price. i suspect the private market back in the 1960s decided they needed to charge exceptionally high prices because the risk of flooding was really, really high and the prices they needed to charge were so high that they would price the consumers out of purchasing the program. and so, i mention this earlier, but there is a fine line of charging the right price, but yet not pricing yourself out of the consumer market. the flood risk unfortunately, you mentioned the storms and all of them being since 2000. you know, the list
with and for the editor that gave me a newspaper column back and the 80's jim squires who told him the columnists are sort of like they don't score many points the keep the crowd alert. [laughter] it may be keeping up to the time schedule may be a challenge but i want to say that of format would be such that we would have opening remarks by charles murray and then by jared bernstein to get about seven minutes to talk over the future of inequality and how big the economic social culture of the dividing is and how it differs from the divide that michael described a half a century ago. and then they will be subjected to about a half hour of questions from me and questions from the audience via index cards some of which have been tweeted i & through the courtesy of modern electronics which i am doing my best to understand in the century since my 23 year old son isn't here with me i will do it to the best i can. this is a timely topic as has been said. by the time the book cannot live is in high school and i remember my factory worker dad what class are we and without hesitation my dad said east -- po knott po
with nancy pelosi. you just had congressman jim czajkowski -- who are you rolled into? >> moderator: we are calling time. our next question is by her professor. >> moderator: given our involvement in a number of military situation throughout the world, what, if anything, would you change about our military policies? gill: i indicated that we should be out of afghanistan already. mission accomplished there. osama bin laden is dead. the situation got muddy and i think other than not, we should recognize that syria is a far more complex tuition when you were reading about in mainstream newspapers. it is evolving into a holy war of sorts. i would tread very carefully and engage in all diplomatic efforts possible. but we have had far too much war in this country for the last decade plus. i don't think that syria or libya, for that matter, i don't think it is a situation that calls for putting the lives of young american men and women in mind. i would support the severe sanctions are taking place in iran and i would encourage ongoing trepidation with results and trends regards to getting invo
essentially would rid the south of all jim crow laws that were oppressing people of color. that became the civil rights act of 1964. lyndon johnson was very much in support of that act. he had been opposed to some civil rights legislation early in his life when he was the representative here in texas. but as he said very pointedly, when he became president in the well-known speech, now that i have the power, i need to use it. never expected to be the president of the united states. he has to realize he's going to run over a lot of the senators and a lot of the representatives with whom he worked when he was in the house and senate. one of them was richard russell. his friend and mentor. a giant senator from the state of georgia who vehemently opposed the civil rights act of 1964. he knows he's going to have run over him to get this passed. and they have a very somber conversation. russell says lbj, you know, you can pass the sack. you have the legislative ability to do it. jack kennedy in, but you do. but i'm warning you, if you do, you will lose the democratic party to the south. you
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)